Ten Tips for Partners at Birth

dad at birth 2While we tend to focus on preparing mama for birth, it is also essential that papas, partners or any other labor supporters to feel prepared.  While it would take the length of a book (or more) to fully prepare papas and partners for the birth experience, here are ten quick and easy essentials to keep in mind.

1.  Be responsive to your partner’s cues and protect her space.  Follow her lead.  Do what you can to ensure she is feeling safe and supported.  Keep the lights dim, the room quiet and the atmosphere calm.

2.  Minimize questions, distractions, and instructions (from yourself and others) especially during contractions.  Don’t take silence personally, it is probably a sign that she is going inside and focusing on the monumental task she is undertaking.  Silence is often a really good sign.

3.  Help her to be comfortable.  Suggest position changes regularly.  Observe her alignment and support her head, torso, low back, arms, hips, knees, and feet as needed.  Keep her warm, but offer ice packs or a cool cloth if she gets too warm.  Use comfort techniques you’ve learned together before the birth.

4.  Maintain your center and your stability.  Find your own breath.  Tend to yourself so that you can tend to her.  Do so discreetly so it doesn’t serve as a distraction.

5.  Take her to the bathroom hourly.

6.  Help her keep the pitch of her voice low and monitor her facial and physical tension.  Help her relax.

7.  Give her encouragement and tell her you love her.  You might even kiss if it feels right.  Feelings of love from mama help her release oxytocin, which can help with labor.

8.  If her breathing gets rapid, shallow and panicked, model a slow, even, deeper breath for her.  Maybe try to make eye contact with her as you do this, it can help to ground her.

9.  Keep her hydrated and nourished.  Offer regular sips of water (you can do so without words).  Offer labor snacks in early and active labor.

10. Help her maintain her rhythm.  Let her find what works best for her and find ways to support her there until its time for her rhythm to change again.

What other advice would you give to papas and partners for labor & birth?

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Labor nourishment

trailmix

Evidence shows that, in most cases, the benefits of eating and drinking throughout labor far exceed any potential or perceived drawbacks.  Women need calories and hydration throughout the hard work of labor in order to birth optimally and avoid risks such as exhaustion (and consequential ineffective contractions), electrolyte imbalance, low blood sugar, and other problems.  Furthermore, perceptions of pain can also be exacerbated when a mama is hungry and/or thirsty in labor.

We’ve written before on the importance of hydration during labor.  Today, we are going to talk about some possible snacks you may consider having on hand for mama during labor (and possibly the birth team—partner, doula, family—too).  If you are birthing at the birth center, you are responsible for bringing your own snacks and fluids for labor.  You’ll also want to bring or have a plan to order delivery of a post-birth meal that is more substantial than your snacks.

Recommendations on choosing labor snacks

You won’t know ahead of time what is going to sound good to you in the throes of labor.  However, you can make some wise choices ahead of time to have food on hand you think you might like to have on hand for the big event.  Having a few different options is a good idea, too, to increase the chances that what you have will sound good when you’re needing nourishment during labor.

  • Choose foods that you like and tolerate well
  • Consider foods that are comforting to you
  • Some suggest selecting the same kinds of food you might choose if you were getting over a cold or flu
  • Consider easy-to-eat, ready-to-eat (or easy-to-prepare) foods
  • Consider packing small quantities of the food you want to bring
  • Many suggest avoiding greasy, heavy, or really rich foods

 Possible foods for labor

Feel free to consider whatever on this list sounds good to you and ignore the rest!

1. Oatmeal

Warm, nourishing, gentle on the tummy and easy to make, oatmeal is a great choice for many mamas in labor.  Add fruit and honey if desired.

2. Fruit

Many women love bananas (a good source of potassium) during labor.  Some swear by frozen grapes.  Many do not care for citrus/acidic fruits in labor, though some do.  Choose whatever fruits you prefer and get them ready to go (cut into bite size pieces if possible) before labor or in early labor.  Dried fruit, such as raisins, cranberries and apricots are also good choices.  Applesauce is also a labor favorite for many mamas.

3. Honey

Honey is a great source of instant energy (carbs) during labor.  It is also not something that requires chewing, which mama may prefer if she is having trouble keeping food down but needs energy.  Honey sticks are easiest for mom to suck on without changing her position.  You can find these in some stores.  We’ve also found them at the St. Paul Farmer’s Market (and perhaps they can be found at other farmer’s markets).

4. Yogurt

A great source of protein and carbohydrates, yogurt is also easy on the tummy.

5. Cheese

In cubes or slices, this snack has calcium and protein for lasting energy.

6. Protein, nut-fruit, or granola bars

Pure Bars and Lara Bars have fewer and whole, quality ingredients compared to other bars.

7. Miso soup or a light soup broth

8. Graham crackers, saltine crackers, other crackers

9. Eggs

Scrambled or hardboiled, eggs are light and contain protein for long lasting energy.

10. Nuts or seeds.

An excellent source of protein packed in tiny bite-sized bits. Try almonds, cashews, pumpkin or sunflower seeds.  You may want to make a trail mix, combining nuts and seeds with dried fruits.

11. Whole grain bagel or toast

12. Popsicles

Opt for a healthy option if possible.  You can also make red raspberry tea, cool it, sweeten, and make into popsicles for labor

What did you enjoy during your labor?

Oxytocin in Childbirth: A Labor of Love

Last week, we talked about the role of endorphins in natural childbirth and today we turn our focus to oxytocin, another crucial hormone in the symphony of chemicals created naturally in the body to help mom and baby through childbirth.

There are four major hormonal systems active during labor: endorphins, oxytocin, adrenaline and noradrenaline, and prolactin.

What is oxytocin?

pregnancy oxytocin

Oxytocin, known as the “love hormone,” is a hormone and neuropeptide that causes both physiological and behavioral effects when produced in the body.  It is produced in the hypothalamus of the brain and is released into the bloodstream via the pituitary gland.

Our bodies produce oxytocin when we are attracted to a mate, during lovemaking (it assists with arousal, fosters bonding and may facilitate sperm and egg transport), following positive social interactions (it can even potentially improve wound healing following such positive interactions, say experts), and with other positive experiences.  It is thought to enhance our capacity to love ourselves and others.

Oxytocin is produced in pregnancy, levels increase significantly during active labor and childbirth, and both mom and baby produce oxytocin after birth and as long as baby breastfeeds.

Oxytocin evokes feelings of contentment, trust, empathy, calmness and security and reduces anxiety and fear. Under certain circumstances, oxytocin can hinder the release of cortisol, or stress hormones.

What are the functions and roles of oxytocin in childbirth?

Oxytocin plays a major role in the following:

  • Uterine contractions that help facilitate dilation in labor
  • Facilitating the milk let-down reflex
  • Fostering the mother-baby bond
  • Encouraging maternal behavior in the first hour after birth
  • Released during breastfeeding, oxytocin causes mild uterine contractions after birth to expel the placenta and close of many blood vessels to prevent bleeding
  • Assisting the uterus in clotting the placental attachment point postpartum

What helps to facilitate the production of oxytocin naturally during labor?

Unhindered production of oxytocin is important in labor because oxytocin is responsible in large part for uterine contractions.  Oxytocin initiates labor and helps it keep going strong.

Because the production of oxytocin is so connected to our emotions, it is paramount that a laboring mama feel calm, secure, and uninhibited in her environment and that she trust those around her.  A dim room without too much excitement or distraction is an environment conducive to the unhindered production of oxytocin.

happy birth

Natural ways to stimulate oxytocin production in labor include:

  • Caring, non-medical touch
  • Nipple stimulation (this can be helpful in getting labor started in some cases, or to increase strength and frequency of contractions)
  • Laughter and humor
  • Kissing (Ina May, a famous midwife, touts “smooching” as a great way to keep labor going)
  • Gentle exercise, dancing and rhythmic movement
  • Feeling grateful and loving (a partner’s words and actions can be so instrumental in helping mama create oxytocin and so help her labor along)
  • The repetitive use of mantras, prayer or sounds
  • Meditation, positive visualization and hypnosis
  • Relaxation
  • Warm bath

What can diminish oxytocin levels in labor?

Again, because of the emotional connection, any experience of fear, anxiety, stress, tension, discomfort, or distrust can negatively effect oxytocin production during labor.  A feeling of being watched can also hinder oxytocin release.  The use of synthetic oxytocin (Pitocin)—which also stimulates contractions and is used to induce labor—can also slow the body’s own production of oxytocin.

Oxytocin in Breastfeeding

oxytocin breastfeedingOxytocin, also called the cuddle hormone, is released by both mama and baby during breastfeeding.  It can cause slight sleepiness, mild euphoria, a higher pain threshold, and increased love for one another.  It also helps build the attraction and strengthen the bond between mama and baby.

As you can see, oxytocin is an amazing gift and tool our bodies make to help us through childbirth and postpartum.

Endorphins in Childbirth: Body’s Natural Painkillers

Mother and babyIt is simply amazing what our bodies are capable of doing.  And at no time is this more obvious than with pregnancy, birth and breastfeeding.  It is incredible how well built the female body is for giving birth.  We have everything we need built into our very chemistry to be able to go through labor and give birth!

In the 1970s scientists discovered what laboring women have witnessed and understood for ages: that the body produces what it needs to temper the physical stress and pain of natural childbirth.  Science put a name to the body’s natural pain killers—endorphins—and discovered exactly how they work in the body before, during, and after birth.  What they found is remarkable. ***

What are endorphins?

Endorphins, specifically beta-endorphins, are hormones secreted within the brain and nervous system in situations of stress or pain.  They are the internal (endogenous) equivalent to our pharmaceutical painkillers, such as morphine (though without the many undesirable effects of the external, or exogenous, drugs).

 Ten cool facts about endorphins in childbirth

1  Endorphin levels increase toward the end of pregnancy.  During labor, endorphin levels rise during each contraction, most noticeably in the second stage of labor. Endorphin levels are highest just after birth.  It takes two weeks after birth for endorphin levels in the body to return to normal.

2  Endorphin levels are highest during vaginal deliveries in unmedicated mothers.  They are lower in women who have a cesarean section after laboring on their own for some time and even lower in women who have a cesarean without experiencing labor.

3  The use of exogenous pain medications (endorphin-like drugs) dramatically decreases the body’s natural production of endorphins.  Unlike narcotics, which are given in “surges” to some laboring women, endorphins are released in a more steady fashion, providing consistent pain relief without the crash that comes with big bursts of chemical pain relief.

4  Endorphins can actually help regulate the pace of labor—high levels produced in the body and slow labor by lowering oxytocin levels, which can serve to regulate the intensity of labor and our ability to manage it.

5  Endorphin levels protect and serve babies during childbirth as well.  Endorphins are elevated in newborns that experience distress during the birth process.

6  Endorphin production in the body is tied to our emotional states.  Stress hormones (i.e. catecholamines) counter endorphins in the body.  The more relaxed and calm a woman is through childbirth, the more endorphins she produces and the less stress hormones her body makes.  A relaxed laboring woman actually feels less pain than a woman who is scared or distressed.  Unresolved stress or anxiety should be processed prior to labor to prevent these from becoming obstacles to her labor experience.

7  Endorphins behave differently from woman to woman, which is perhaps one factor in why women have different perceptions of the pain of childbirth.

8  Endorphins stimulate the production of prolactin, the relaxing “mothering” hormone that aids in breastfeeding and mama-baby bonding after birth.

9  Endorphins are the cause of the “high” many women experience during labor and in the early days postpartum.  They assist in allowing a woman to be alert and attentive to her newborn despite sleep deficits.

10  Endorphins are present in breast milk, which may explain the natural high that babies can get after breastfeeding.

***Note: Natural hormones oxytocin and prolactin also play a major role in birth, though this article focuses primarily on endorphins.

All about Birth Doulas

doula artMany of our clients wonder what is the benefit of hiring a doula for a birth center or home birth.  After all, isn’t your midwife a lot like a doula?  Not necessarily.

We love it when our families choose to have a doula and believe it provides many benefits before, during and after birth.  In fact, we believe so wholeheartedly in the benefits of a doula that we have a doula internship program, which links newer doulas with families in our care.

In this post, we’ll explore what a doula is, how she* fits into your birth team, what support she offers, and what he training looks like. In our next post, we will talk about the many benefits of a doula

*While there are some male doulas, most doulas are female and thus the use of “she” here.      

What is a birth doula? 

A birth doula is a trained professional with knowledge of the physiology of birth and the emotional needs of laboring women.  She offers continuous emotional and physical (but not medical) support to mom and her partner throughout labor.

Doula as a unique part of the care team

While a midwife knows and supports a mom and her partner, she is chiefly responsible for the medical and clinical care of mom and baby during labor.  She may offer intermittent support and comfort as well.  A doula will offer continuous emotional support and comfort as soon as early labor, as a woman and her family desires.  Nurses are present to help with the medical and clinical aspects of birth and may not be familiar to the family prior to birth.  A family often knows their doula before labor.  A partner offers emotional support and loves the mom and baby like no one else on the birth team, but does not typically have the knowledge and experience that a doula can offer.

What does a doula do?

doulalaborpushSome of the specific support services a doula provides include:

  • Before birth, she often meets with an expectant family one or more times to get to know them, their wishes, hopes, and fears, and so come to understand how best to serve them in labor.  This also gives the family and doula an opportunity to develop a rapport and build trust.
  • A birth doula works to empower families through education and access to resources before, during and after labor.  She does not speak for a woman or her partner, but helps them make informed decisions and advocate for themselves and their desired birth vision.
  • In labor, a birth doula provides continuous support, meaning they will come to your side during labor when you wish (at home or in the birth center) and stay with you all the way through your labor and delivery and the first few hours postpartum.
  • A doula supports the role of the partner, and does not usurp his role in a woman’s labor; conversely she supports and enriches this bond and this support.
  • A birth doula can help suggest and facilitate physical comfort measures to help a woman cope through labor.
  • She offers emotional support to both the laboring woman and her partner.  She remains calm and objective throughout the birth process.
  • She facilitates communication between members of the birth team (professionals and kin).
  • After the birth, doulas often meet with families, offering breastfeeding and early postpartum support.

What does a doula NOT do?

A doula does not:

  • Provide medical information or clinical advice.  She will not perform clinical or medical tasks such as taking mom’s blood pressure or temperature, monitoring fetal heart rate, performing vaginal exams, etc.
  • Make decisions for a woman or her partner, or interfere with their care
  • Judge a woman or her partner for their wishes and choices in birth
  • Take away from the role of the partner or any other birth team member

What training does a doula have?

doulatrainingBirth doulas have a choice to become certified with a certifying body or not. The most common, though not the only, certifying body is DONA, or Doulas International (formerly Doulas of North America, hence the acronym).  Bear in mind that uncertified doulas may have the same level of experience and qualifications but have chosen, for one reason or another, not to become certified.  For this reason, it is important to ask prospective doulas about their experience.

To become a DONA-certified doula, a person must:

  • Read five selected books on childbirth and breastfeeding and additional materials.
  • Complete childbirth preparation (often a childbirth education series of at least 12 hours)
  • Complete at least 3 hours of breastfeeding training
  • Complete a doula training program of at least 16 hours
  • Attend at least 3 births (evaluated by the laboring woman and her care team)
  • Develop a resource list for clients
  • And more.

How much does a doula cost?

Doula services, which vary based on a doula’s experience, her included services, and other factors, can range anywhere from free to over $1000.  Some doulas have a set fee while others use a sliding scale.

While most insurance coverage does not cover doula services, the benefits of having a doula are so well demonstrated that insurance companies and the state are beginning to consider and adopt coverage for doulas.  It’s always a good idea to ask your insurance carrier if they cover doula care (every request for a service, even if not approved, is documented and is taken into account by the insurance carrier when determining covered services in the future).

Bear in mind that a doula has often completed a rigorous training process, makes herself available on call for a 4 to 5 week period around a woman’s due date, spends anywhere from a few hours to a few days with a laboring family (sometimes paying for childcare and other expenses while away), devotes hours to supporting a family before and after labor, and has professional expenses like any other independent small business professional.

How do I find a doula? 

  • Talk to us!  We have a list of a few doulas we know and recommend. We can also talk to you about our doula interns.
  • Childbirth Collective Parent Topic Night: All About Doulas.  This is a great event held monthly in Saint Paul and Minneapolis where doulas and expectant families gather to meet and talk about doulas. The Collective also has a list of doulas on their website.
  • Blooma.  Many of the yoga teachers and educators at Blooma are also doulas.  This may be a great way to make a connection.
  • Childbirth education classes.  This can be another possible avenue to connect with a doula.
  • Word of Mouth.  Talk to other mamas who have had doulas and find out who they recommend.

Check out our related post on the benefits of having a doula!

The benefits of a doula

doulaIn our last post, we covered the basics about doulas—what a doula is, what she does, how she fits into the birth team, her training and how to find a doula.  Today, we talk about the many proven benefits of having a doula.

In 2011, an extensive study—the largest systematic review of continuous labor support—demonstrated the effects of having a doula for over 15,000 women who participated in 21 randomized controlled trials.  The study authors concluded from this extensive research that:

Having continuous labor support has clinically significant benefits for women and their babies and no known harm.  All women should have support through labor. 

Other experts have said that if the benefits of a doula could be bottled up in a jar and given to laboring women, it would be a crime not to use such a potent medicine.

Doulas mean better outcomes for mom

The best and most recent studies show that women with continuous labor support have:

  • shorter labors (by about 40 minutes on average)
  • a greater chance at spontaneous vaginal birth
  • fewer interventions, such as cesarean section or vacuum extraction with forceps
  • lower rates of epidural or analgesia to manage pain
  • lower rates of induction (via Pitocin)
  • more positive feelings toward their birth experiences, leading to a cascade of positive effects including
  • lower rates of postpartum depression

Specific studies have found that doulas help increase a laboring woman’s self esteem and actually can decrease her perception of physical pain during childbirth.

If we are just talking continuous labor support, wouldn’t a partner or a friend have the same effect?  Not necessarily.

The effects of continuous labor support are strongest when the person is not a member of the hospital staff or a person in the woman’s social network, and was present solely to provide one-on-one labor support (i.e. a professional doula).  With a doula, specifically, women were:

  • 34% less likely to view their birth experience negatively
  • 31% less likely to use synthetic oxytocin to speed up labor
  • 28% less likely to have a c-section
  • 12% more likely to have spontaneous vaginal birth
  • 9% less likely to use pain medication

Newborn in mother's handsDoulas mean better outcomes for babies

Research also shows improved outcomes for babies when doulas are present for a laboring woman.  These babies have:

  • better APGAR scores at birth
  • shorter hospital stays
  • fewer admissions to special care nurseries
  • have greater early breastfeeding success
  • have more affectionate mothers in the postpartum

In sum, the most important thing is for women to have continuous labor support from someone– a nurse, midwife, partner, or doula. However, with several birth outcomes, doulas have a stronger effect than other types of support persons.

For tips on how to find a doula, please see our post here. 

Why Write your Birth Story?

WritingBirthStoryCoverArtGrowing, birthing and caring for a new baby is one of the most joyful times in our adult lives, and also one of the most demanding.  During the postpartum period, so many peripheral tasks may be vying for our attention (and, for many of us, all we really care to do is stare at our beautiful new baby…and sleep whenever possible.)

Making time to write your birth story may seem like one extra thing on the to-do list, but there are many reasons to make this task a priority.

Writing your birth story is a transformative, cathartic experience, with the power to help you process, make meaning from, heal from, preserve, celebrate and honor your unique experience of birth.

The following are eight great reasons to write your birth story.

1:  To remember

Writing your birth story preserves your memory of this important event for a lifetime (or longer!)  In the early days, you may run through your birth story again and again in your mind, remembering all the little details of this amazing experience.  But as time goes on, these details inevitably fade.

While it is ideal to begin writing in the early postpartum, it’s never too late.  If it has been months or longer since the birth of your baby, it is still very much worth your time to write your birth story (you surely remember more of it now than you will ten years from now!).

Memory-joggers, such as labor playlists and pictures, can help you recall fading details.  Talking to your partner or others present at your birth can also help to fill in the details of your birth, so you can write and preserve these memories.

TIP: If you can’t sit down to write out the narrative of your story, at least jot down some notes in those early hours and days after your baby’s arrival.  In the last weeks of pregnancy, consider getting a small bedside journal or type notes into a phone app or email to yourself.  (This can be helpful not only for jotting down birth story details but also for remembering the questions you want to ask your care providers—midwives, doulas, pediatrician, etc).

2:  To process and reflect

The experience of giving birth is one of the most profound, transformational, and emotionally rich experiences we will have in our lives.  In fact, how we gave birth can have a profound effect on how we see ourselves, how we feel about ourselves, and how we interact with others—including our baby.  For many women, it is imperative to their well being to talk about and process their birth stories.

Given the intensity of the birth experience, our memories can be jumbled or even chaotic-seeming until we have a chance to process them and assemble them in narrative form.  Writing can stabilize our experiences.

Writing your birth story enables a unique mode of processing that can’t necessarily be achieved through talking alone.  Writing accesses different parts of our brain—it is a reflective and reflexive practice that can help you process your story on a deeper level, helping you to explore and understand your experience in a particular way.  People often discover how they feel about something or find feelings transmuted as they begin to explore them through writing.  New perspective can be reached as you process and reflect on your birth experience by writing it down.

3:  To Heal

Along those same lines, writing your birth experience can be a healing experience.  One woman, reflecting on writing her birth story, commented: “At first I felt disappointed and angry that I didn’t not get to have the natural birth that I wanted.  But as I wrote about our transfer, how I ultimately delivered my baby, and how I felt when I held her, the anger changed and I felt like I was speaking not just for myself but for other women that don’t get to have their ‘perfect birth.’ I also realized that though the birth didn’t go as planned, I was surrounded by support of my husband and midwife. I ultimately felt strong and like I did my best in a situation I couldn’t entirely control.”

Both writing and storytelling are time-honored methods of healing from challenging life experiences.  While writing can’t always take away the trauma of difficult childbirth (or any experience), it can help us to express how we are truly feeling—it can give voice to the grief, disappointment, shock, and sorrow—and may help us come to terms with what happened and begin to make peace with it.

When we share our story on paper or maybe with others, we can find support, feel less alone, and become more empowered.  Saying: “this happened to me and this is how I am feeling about it” is a powerful exercise on the healing path.  Remember, while you can’t always change the past, you always have the power to change your connection to the past in this moment.

If you are struggling with aspects of your birth experience, you deserve to have the support you need to continue processing and healing.  In addition to writing, speaking with a counselor, having body/energy work, making birth art, healing through movement, and other measures can go along way to helping you find peace after difficult childbirth.

4:  To share

When we write about our birth experiences, we can share them with others—which has a number of potential benefits.  Sharing our story can help us bond with other people and find support.

When we share with our partners and other support people, it helps them gain insight into our perception of the birth, which can increase empathy and understanding and invite conversations about aspects of the shared experience.  When we share with other women, especially other mothers, we can find support, understanding, and camaraderie.

Sharing can have an unknown or unanticipated ripple effect.  You never know how your story will help someone else.  But it probably will.

5:  For your child

And let’s not forget our little ones (as if we could).  Writing down your birth story will enable you to share this story with your child and family for decades to come.

Consider for a moment what you know about how you were born.  Do you know the details?  Did your mother document your birth in some way?  Do you wish you knew more?

People whose mothers have a written their birth story often report gratitude for having such a treasured account of how they came into the world.  It can make your child feel special and important to know that you took the time to document their birth.  Whether or not it was an ideal situation, this birth was how they came into the world and it will always be special for them to know about it.  The experiences you had and the lessons they teach can have a profound impact on your child, both when they are young and when they grow up (and perhaps have children of their own).



“I printed out our birth story and placed it in my daughter’s baby book so she can look back and read about the day she was born. I can only hope that it will inspire her to have a birth without fear when she is ready to birth to her own baby someday,” reported one mama. 

6:  To preserve the beauty and spirit of the birth process

Many women (and men!) are profoundly affected by the stories of birth.  Birth is a sacred and primal process that connects us to our roots and to something greater than ourselves.  Author and healer Tami Lynn Kent calls birth the process of coming to the spirit door.

Like the beautiful children we birth, each birth story is completely unique and all have elements of the extraordinary in them.

Some women are driven to write their birth stories in an attempt to capture that beauty and power in words.  It can take some courage to do this.  While it may be “safer” to stick to the medical facts, writing about one’s full experience of birth—the physical, emotional, and spiritual—can be a powerful act.  Being honest about the deeper layers of your birth experience can be a true gift to yourself, your family, and anyone fortunate enough to hear your story.

7:  To help and inspire others

For most of human history, storytelling was the most potent way to transmit knowledge among kin.  In the past, we had a much greater connection to the world of birth and babies than we do today.  By the time we reached adulthood, we would have likely heard many birth stories, if not witnessed many births ourselves.

One woman writes: It’s sad that we don’t live in a culture where women gather post birth, removed from responsibility and routine, to sit around the fire under the stars with our female clan (including the elders and the young) and share our birth stories. Too many of our stories get lost in our hearts.”

While we are less connected to birth and birth wisdom today, telling our stories can be a way to reconnect to ourselves, each other and the wisdom of birth.

Telling your birth story can help other women in your life.  We can learn so much from each other and our mothers; and our children can learn from us when we take time to talk about our birth experiences.

When things don’t go as planned and we are brave enough to share our story, we can help other women who have or will experience similar situations.  Likewise, when we have a positive experience of birth, sharing our story can be a way of showing other women what it looks like to birth naturally, or without fear.  Hearing positive birth experiences is a powerful antidote to the mainstream perceptions of birth as a risk-laden, painful medical event.  In this way, the personal can become political, as we spread the truth that birth can be a positive, fearless, beautiful experience.

8:  To change our collective perceptions of birth

It was not so long ago that women were put under anesthesia (“twilight sleep”) during labor, completely disconnected from the experience of their births.  It is not uncommon in many parts of the world for women to have few options or control over their birthing experiences.  Even those with more choice may feel like it’s not acceptable or desirable to speak about their birth experiences.  It can almost feel taboo to speak candidly about birth, much less celebrate and honor this experience.

Writing and sharing your birth story can be a political act.  It can be a way of saying “Birth is important.  The WOMEN who birth are important.  MY birth is important. “ Regardless of how you feel about your birth, putting words to your experience is a powerful way to show that your experience matters.  Because it does.

Some women may feel reluctant to write their stories.  Maybe they don’t know where to start, are afraid they aren’t going to tell it right (impossible!), or get stuck in the practical limitations of sitting down to write with a little baby to care for.   But nothing worth doing is ever easy (cases in point: pregnancy and childbirth).  While not easy, these labors of love are worth it.

If you’ve written your birth story and want to share it with others, please consider submitting your birth story to be posted on our blog (with pictures too if you wish!)
If you need a little help carving out time, want to receive some guidance and feedback, or just want to write and share your story among other mamas, please consider joining us for our upcoming Write Your Birth Story Workshop in September 2013.
For information about either birth story submission or the upcoming workshop, contact Jaime@health-foundations.com.